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Respecting & Protecting Copyright in the Wild Wild Web

In a world where zoom has a new meaning and everyone is a content producer, what are the rules for respecting and protecting copyright? Noted author, educator, and entertainment & IP attorney Thomas A. Crowell and Donald R. Simon, JD/MA, Director, Member & Staff Education at National Cable Television Cooperative, discusses this and other questions related to content licensing, fair-use, joint authorship, and more in the above video.

What makes the conversation useful is that Don and Thomas both combine a knowledge of the law with a background in the arts. Crowell, the author of the book, The Pocket Lawyer for Filmmakers, provides entertaining and informative visuals to help steer the conversation. Some takeaways:

  • WFH has a totally different and very important meaning in the world of content contracts.
  • Film schools aren’t doing enough to prepare students for the business side of the creative business.
  • Securing rights upfront is a must-do and an investment in the future.

Highlights

The conversation highlights are below. Click on a timecode to jump to that point in a new YouTube window.

THIS PRESENTATION HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR EDUCATIONAL AND INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE LEGAL ADVICE OR A LEGAL OPINION. PLEASE BE AWARE THAT QUESTIONS YOU RAISE DURING THE WORKSHOP ARE NOT CONFIDENTIAL. ONLY YOUR ATTORNEY CAN ADVISE YOU WHICH LAWS ARE APPLICABLE TO YOUR SPECIFIC CASE AND SITUATION. WHILE THE PRESENTER HAS USED REASONABLE EFFORTS TO INCLUDE ACCURATE AND UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION, THE PRESENTER MAKES NO WARRANTIES OR REPRESENTATIONS AS TO THE ACCURACY OF THE CONTENT AND ASSUMES NO LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERROR OR OMISSION IN THE CONTENT. THIS WEBINAR IS PRESENTED ON AN “AS IS” BASIS.

One response to “Respecting & Protecting Copyright in the Wild Wild Web”

  1. Ken Pyle Avatar

    9:50 Something NOT touched upon in the discussion but material to WFH claims : For a freelance/independent (non-employee) creative work to be a work-for-hire project that’s own by the commissioning party (company), the work being produced must be signed by both commissioning party and the freelancer (typically prior to starting the work) AND MUST fall into one of NINE enumerated categories, like a contribution to a collective work, or part of a motion picture/audiovisual work, a translation, etc.

    Notwithstanding “transfer agreement language,” if it does NOT fall into one of those specific categories, the commissioned work can NOT be part of a WFH corporation ownership.

    See: https://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ09.pdf (page 1).

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